Archive for the ‘Built Works’ Category

The first therapeutic garden in Romania!

Thursday, July 10th, 2014

Planting in Romania healing garden

Landscape engineer Nicsanu Marcela recently posted a photo on our TLN Facebook page with an image of raised flower beds and this caption: “First therapeutic garden in Romania!” That was pretty exciting. I emailed her to ask whether she’d like to do a guest blog post, and she agreed. Here is her post:

The first therapeutic garden in Romania opened its doors in June 2014, at Mocrea Psychiatric Hospital in Arad County. This first garden opened the way for horticultural therapy, a healing method used in almost some psychiatric hospitals in Western Europe and the USA.

Romania garden arbor

The garden covers an area of about 1,500 square meters and is composed of three major areas:

  • The area where the preparation of the floricultural material takes place (on specially constructed tables, patients work with seeds and sprouts in pots);
  • The wooden box area (garden beds built to facilitate arranging flowers, ideal for group therapy);
  • The ground garden area (patients can arrange the resulting material in various arrangements).

And so, the patients can follow their work in stages, thus being responsible for the very first seed put into the pot labeled with their names, then replanting the first seedlings in larger pots until the final result to transplant them into one of the raised planters or the ground.

The plants used were chosen based on their role, so there are three distinct categories:

  1. Sensory plants (Sedum, Miscanthus, Salvia argentea);
  2. Aromatic plants  (Mentha piperita, Ocimum basilicum, Thymus, Melissa);
  3. Plants that are relaxing by color and fragrance (Lavender, Jasmine, Impatiens, Dianthus, Euonymus, Clematis, Rudbeckia).

Over 3,000 plants (flowers and shrubs) were planted. On the working tables, we started the therapy with 100 envelopes of perennials and annual flower seeds and 150 bulbs.

Approximately 40 patients were drawn to this horticultural therapy with different tasks, for example: Watering flowers in the garden or pots, weeding,  replanting seedlings, peeling dried flowers, putting  seeds in pots, and arranging the garden beds.

The first therapeutic garden in Romania wants to be the leading horticultural therapy in Romania to support patients who are in the process of rediscovery and recovery.

Landscape engineer- Nicsanu Marcela Romanian healing garden

Many thanks to Landscape engineer Nicsanu Marcela (center) for this post!

 

The Enabling Garden at Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital

Sunday, March 9th, 2014
Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital

A lily pond and lush plantings make this garden an excellent place for rehab work.

Horticultural Therapy is, in a nutshell, the use of plants, gardens, and other aspects of nature to improve people’s social, spiritual, physical, and emotional well-being. Check out the HT page on the TLN website, and the organizations American Horticultural Therapy Association and the Horticultural Therapy Institute for more information. The new book, Therapeutic Landscapes: An Evidence-Based Approach to Designing Healing Gardens and Restorative Outdoor Spaces also has a great chapter on HT, written by the inimitable Teresia Hazen at Legacy Health in Portland, OR.

Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital

A horticultural therapist works with a client

The HT program at Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital is well-established and respected in the field. Thanks to Pam Young, the Horticultural Therapist there, for this description of their program, and for the accompanying photos.

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Boston Children’s Hospital’s Prouty Garden under threat of demolition. Guest post by Clare Cooper Marcus

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013
Boston Children's Hospital Prouty Garden

The Prouty Garden at Boston Children’s Hospital has served as a tranquil green urban oasis since 1956

The Prouty Garden at Boston Children’s Hospital has, for generations of patients, family members, and staff, served as a much-loved retreat from the clinical atmosphere inside. The garden was created in 1956, sponsored by Mrs. Olive Prouty whose two children had died in the hospital. Now it is under threat of demolition as the hospital looks for space to expand on its very urban site.

A petition to save the garden has already garnered over 6,500 signatures, but they need more! Please sign and help spread the word. Newspaper articles and radio reports (see, for example, WBUR and The Boston Globe) have taken up the story to plead for the retention of this irreplaceable green oasis.

A Scientific American article last year called the Prouty Garden “one of the most successful hospital gardens in the country.” Though though constructed long before our research-based knowledge of the critical issues in hospital garden design – it is almost perfect as a restorative space in healthcare. (more…)

THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AWARD FOR HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENTS – Applications due 9/20!

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013
Photo by Henry Domke, www.henrydomke.com

Photo by Henry Domke, www.henrydomke.com

I don’t usually make titles all in bold, but this is such an exciting opportunity, I wanted to grab your attention.

Vendome Group, publisher of Healthcare Design, Environments for Aging and Behavioral Healthcare, is excited to announce our inaugural The Landscape Architecture Award for Healthcare Environments!

Landscape Architecture projects will be featured in a special digital magazine that will reach more than 80,000 readers.

Highlights of this program include:

  • An ideal audience: Projects will be seen by Architects, Designers, Administrators, C-Suite Executives within healthcare communities, and more.
  • Recognition for exceptional landscape architecture and design within 3 categories: Acute Care, Senior Living and Behavioral Healthcare.
  • A low entry fee: Cost to enter is only $350 per project.
  • Expert Panelists: A jury of industry experts will choose one winner and runner-up within each of the 3 categories to be published in the digital magazine.

Award winners and runners-up will receive:

  • A 2-page spread, at no cost, featured in the digital magazine.
  • A prestigious award engraved with the firm and facility names; and
  • Editorial coverage in 2014.

All other firms with accepted projects will have the option to include their project in the digital magazine for a nominal fee.

As the Director of the Therapeutic Landscapes Network, I can’t tell you how excited I am about this program. Oh, wait, I just did.

Applications are due SOON – 9/20/13 so pull your material together and submit it!

To learn more, visit: www.healthcaredesignmagazine.com/page/landscape-architecture-awards-healthcare-environments

 

Going to the hospital and we’re…gonna get married

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013
Les & Betty Krueger Family Healing Garden

Staff, patients, and visitors enjoy the Les & Betty Krueger Family Healing Garden.

The hospital isn’t somewhere most people plan on getting married. In fact, the idea might be hard for some to imagine. But what if really wanted to get married, and you really couldn’t leave the hospital…where would you choose for the wedding? Your room? Probably not, especially if it’s a shared room. The chapel? Maybe, but not all hospital chapels are that inspiring, and not all are non-denominational. So, how about outside in the garden? A quiet, neutral place away from the sharp corners, beeping machines, and sterile surfaces. A place with fresh air, sunlight, and greenery.

Though there have surely been more, we know of at least three weddings that have taken place in healing gardens at hospitals in the United States. In all cases, the patient was too ill to leave and was determined to say their vows, in the garden.

This quote is from one of the employees at Harrison Medical Center, which just recently opened the Les & Betty Krueger Family Healing Garden:

I was in the garden this morning when a chaplain came in with a patient’s mother.  Her son was on one of our surgery floors and was supposed to be getting married tomorrow.  His mother asked if they could get married in the garden.  They had a huge wedding planned.  We then discovered his bride to be was a nurse on one of our units.  So I talked with Catering and Security to plan.  We are having a small ceremony in the garden and reception on our front patio tomorrow.  Catering jumped right in to help with food and setting up the patio.  Security is blocking off one of our lots for parking.  I cannot think of a more therapeutic or sacred use of the garden than entering into matrimony.  Definitely one I would not expect.

Thanks to the landscape architect, Mark Epstein of Hafs Epstein, for sharing, and to Harrison Medical Center for letting us re-print the story! For some more photos of the garden, click here.